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Reuben’s Restaurant

Reuben’s Restaurant

Reuben’s Restaurant

Food photography

The new Reuben’s Restaurant is situated just off the main street in Franschhoek,  2 Daniel Hugo Rd and  much of what guests have come to love about the Reuben’s experience remain, but it’s presented in new, fresh and personal packaging, with Reuben and Maryke’s personalities and tastes evident throughout. “The gap between maintaining the heart and soul of the Reuben’s experience, which our guests have come to know and trust over the years, and all of the potential and excitement of something new and completely ours, is where our creativity can really be let loose and flourish,” says Reuben Riffel. “It’s time for a new look and for pushing ourselves to constantly offer our customers a better experience, and we’re bursting with positive energy for everything to come!”

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Reuben’s Restaurant

Reuben’s Restaurant

The new Reuben’s Restaurant is situated just off the main street in Franschhoek,  2 Daniel Hugo Rd and  much of what guests have come to love about the Reuben’s experience remain, but it’s presented in new, fresh and personal packaging, with Reuben and Maryke’s personalities and tastes evident throughout. “The gap between maintaining the heart and soul of the Reuben’s experience, which our guests have come to know and trust over the years, and all of the potential and excitement of something new and completely ours, is where our creativity can really be let loose and flourish,” says Reuben Riffel. “It’s time for a new look and for pushing ourselves to constantly offer our customers a better experience, and we’re bursting with positive energy for everything to come!”

For reservations please email to reservations@reubens.co.za

Photographer: Sandro Tasso

 

 

Coco Africa

Coco Africa

Coco Africa

An innovative company designing and producing unique timber lifestyle products. Each item is skillfully crafted from wood, a priceless material, by gifted local craftsmen from the Franschhoek community. Coco Africa team focuses on the highest standards of manufacturing, joinery and finishing. This artistry results in the beautiful smooth finish, a trademark of Coco Africa’s products.

For wood care & other products visit cocoafrica.co.za all products are made in Franschhoek, South Africa for wood lovers…

All images taken with Olympus OM-D EM-1 mark II and Zuiko pro lenses

Photographer: Sandro Tasso

 

 

Destemming

Destemming time at Boekenhoutskloof Wine Farm Franschhoek

Destemming time at Boekenhoutskloof Wine Farm Franschhoek

The harvesting of wine grapes is one of the most crucial steps in the process of winemaking. The time of harvest is determined primarily by the ripeness of the grape as measured by sugar, acid and tannin levels with winemakers basing their decision to pick based on the style of wine they wish to produce. The weather can also shape the timetable of harvesting with the threat of heat, rain, hail, and frost which can damage the grapes and bring about various vine diseases. In addition to determining the time of the harvest, winemakers and vineyard owners must also determine whether to use hand pickers or mechanical harvesters. The harvest season typically falls between August & October in the Northern Hemisphere and February & April in the Southern Hemisphere. With various climate conditions, grape varieties, and wine styles the harvesting of grapes could happen in every month of the calendar year somewhere in the world.

After the grapes are sorted, they are ready to be de-stemmed and crushed. For many years, men and women did this manually by stomping the grapes with their feet. Nowadays, most wine makers perform this mechanically. Mechanical presses stomp or trod the grapes into what is called must. Must is simply freshly pressed grape juice that contains the skins, seeds, and solids. Mechanical pressing has brought tremendous sanitary gain as well as increased the longevity and quality of the wine.

The destemmer, which is a piece of winemaking machinery that does exactly what it says, removes the stems from the clusters and lightly crushes the grapes.

Modern crushing and destemming machines consist of a large steel or aluminum trough with a screw in the bottom. As the screw turns the grapes are gently squeezed and pulled from the stems at the same time. Out one end pops the stem and out the other is your elixir of life (to be). 

For white wine, the wine maker will quickly crush and press the grapes in order to separate the juice from the skins, seeds, and solids. This is to prevent unwanted color and tannins from leaching into the wine. Red wine, on the other hand, is left in contact with the skins to acquire flavor, color, and additional tannins.

Shot in Franschhoek at Boekenhoutskloof Wine Farm

Gear: Olympus OM-D EM-1 mark II

Lenses: Zuiko 25mm f1.2 PRO | Zuiko 40-150mm f2.8 PRO

 

Polo game at Val de Vie Estate

Polo game at Val de Vie Estate

Polo game at Val de Vie Estate.

Val de Vie Estate, situated in the beautiful Paarl Franschhoek Valley, is a landmark of unsurpassed excellence. Here dreams are transformed into a breathtaking reality, making each event an extraordinary experience.

A polo game at Val de Vie is nothing short of spectacular, capturing a true sense of tradition and occasion.

Photographs by Sandro Tasso Olympus Ambassador in South Africa

Gear used Olympus OM-D EM-1 mark II and Zuiko 30

 

Bridge House Grade 7 Farewell

Bridge House Grade 7 Farewell Sneak Peek

Bridge House Grade 7 Farewell Sneak Peek in the beautiful location of Boschendal Farm in Franschhoek

 

 

Scott

Scott

Scott

Some photographs of Scott and his friends taken at Val de Vie Estate

Olympus EM-1 Olympus Pen F with Olympus 45mm f1.8 Pana Leica 15mm f1.7 and Nokton 50mm f1.5

 

Literature Festival Franschhoek 2016

Literature Festival Franschhoek 2016

Literature Festival Franschhoek 2016
a celebration of books and writers
in association with Porcupine Ridge and Sunday Times

Camera: Olympus OM-D EM-1

Lens: Olympus 7-14mm f2.8 PRO | Olympus 40-150mm f2.8 PRO

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Harvest time at Goedgedacht Olive Farm

Harvest time at Goedgedacht Olive Farm situated on the sloes of Kasteelberg near Riebeek Kasteel

Olives for oil are picked when the olive have just turned green to purple and they’re at their fullest with oil.

As with wine the flavour of the olive oil depends on the variety, the climate, the cultivation methods and the terrain.

After olive trees have flowered the fruit starts to develop. Initially the olives are green and hard. Gradually as they ripen they change colour to yellow-green and then to reddish purple and finally to black.

Unripe olives have high levels of chlorophyll which gives them their green colour. During the ripening process the levels of chlorophyll fall and increasing amounts of carotenoid (the pigment which produces the darkening of the fruit) develop.

The traditional method of olive picking involves combing the ripe fruit from the tree into nets, or hand picking into baskets tied around the waist. Ladders are used to climb up into the trees to reach the fruit.

The quality of the olive oil will reflect the care taken at each stage.  To produce the finest cold pressed extra virgin olive oil the olives will be harvested by hand, treated with the utmost care and pressed quickly.  This helps retain the finest taste and quality.

Oil types:

Extra-virgin olive oil comes from virgin oil production only, contains no more than 0.8% acidity, and is judged to have a superior taste. Extra Virgin olive oil accounts for less than 10% of oil in many producing countries.

Virgin olive oil comes from virgin oil production only, has acidity less than 2%, and is judged to have a good taste.

Pure olive oil is usually a blend of refined and virgin production oil.

Olive oil is a blend of virgin and refined production oil, of no more than 1.5% acidity.

You will also find oil described as ‘first press’ and ‘cold pressed’ – the first press yields the most flavoursome oil and pressing the oil without heat results in a smaller amount of higher quality product.

Camera: Olympus OM-D EM-1

Lens: Olympus 12-40mm f2.8 PRO | Olympus 40-150mm f2.8 PRO

 

 

Olympus Pen F

Olympus Pen F

Olympus Pen F
A timeless design. An extraordinary textured body. From the very first moment you touch the OLYMPUS PEN-F this camera will create a feeling of something special that will stay with you forever. The pure expression of OLYMPUS design that will inspire you for a lifetime.

Using multi shot technology the camera can produce 50 megapixel equivalent images in JPEG and an 80mp RAW file.  This obviously is best for static scenes and performance while on a tripod but is does allow for superb detailed images when needed.  This is especially suited for interiors and product type of photography.

Just a turn of the dial to Mono allows you to capture monochromatic images.  This mono mode has the ability to adjust the image based on color filters and degrees of intensity.  Under the Mode selector knob on top of the camera is a lever control and by pushing left or right on it you bring up different options on the rear LCD screen.  You can for example select simulated Red filter and then vary the degree of intensity of the filter. When shooting blue skies it’s just like applying colored filters in the traditional B&W days.

Some samples taken with the new Olympus Pen F in monochrome mode II