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Reuben’s Restaurant

Reuben’s Restaurant

Reuben’s Restaurant

Food photography

The new Reuben’s Restaurant is situated just off the main street in Franschhoek,  2 Daniel Hugo Rd and  much of what guests have come to love about the Reuben’s experience remain, but it’s presented in new, fresh and personal packaging, with Reuben and Maryke’s personalities and tastes evident throughout. “The gap between maintaining the heart and soul of the Reuben’s experience, which our guests have come to know and trust over the years, and all of the potential and excitement of something new and completely ours, is where our creativity can really be let loose and flourish,” says Reuben Riffel. “It’s time for a new look and for pushing ourselves to constantly offer our customers a better experience, and we’re bursting with positive energy for everything to come!”

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Reuben’s Restaurant

Reuben’s Restaurant

The new Reuben’s Restaurant is situated just off the main street in Franschhoek,  2 Daniel Hugo Rd and  much of what guests have come to love about the Reuben’s experience remain, but it’s presented in new, fresh and personal packaging, with Reuben and Maryke’s personalities and tastes evident throughout. “The gap between maintaining the heart and soul of the Reuben’s experience, which our guests have come to know and trust over the years, and all of the potential and excitement of something new and completely ours, is where our creativity can really be let loose and flourish,” says Reuben Riffel. “It’s time for a new look and for pushing ourselves to constantly offer our customers a better experience, and we’re bursting with positive energy for everything to come!”

For reservations please email to reservations@reubens.co.za

Photographer: Sandro Tasso

 

 

FFG Futurum Financial Group

FFG Futurum Financial Group

FFG Futurum Financial Group

was formed on 1 October 1998. FFG has been assigning our experience and resources for more than 27 years, providing seamless, tailor, made insurance and risk solutions for top South African public companies, thousands of privately owned businesses and many more private individuals.

FFG is a leading independent financial services company, delivering a broad range of financial services and products. We specifically focus on areas of Wealth Creation and Preservation, Asset Risk Management Insurance Solutions and Employee Benefit Solutions. With more than 150 colleagues nationally, FFG unite to add value for clients via innovative and effective risk and people solutions and through industry leading resources and technical expertise.

FFG has the resources and network to support your company’s growth. As an insurance based financial services provider, FFG focuses its activities on its key markets in strategie destinations throughout South Africa. With strong capabilities, matched by high standards of professionalism, we aim to be trusted as a corporate citizen that responds to the diverse expectations of stakeholders, including shareholders, customers, business partners, and employees.

Transformation plays a pivotal part of our growth strategy in South Africa.

FFG has become the cornerstone for many successful individuals and businesses in numerous sectors.

Photographer: Sandro Tasso

Location: Wide Angle photo studio Paarl

 

Charlotte

Charlotte

Charlotte

I had the opportunity to take some pictures to this little princess in the beautiful location of La Bourgogne Wine farm in Franschhoek.

Fun fun fun!

Coco Africa

Coco Africa

Coco Africa

An innovative company designing and producing unique timber lifestyle products. Each item is skillfully crafted from wood, a priceless material, by gifted local craftsmen from the Franschhoek community. Coco Africa team focuses on the highest standards of manufacturing, joinery and finishing. This artistry results in the beautiful smooth finish, a trademark of Coco Africa’s products.

For wood care & other products visit cocoafrica.co.za all products are made in Franschhoek, South Africa for wood lovers…

All images taken with Olympus OM-D EM-1 mark II and Zuiko pro lenses

Photographer: Sandro Tasso

 

 

Merino sheep

Merino sheep

Merino sheep.

The Merino is an excellent forager and very adaptable. It is bred predominantly for its wool, and its carcass size is generally smaller than that of sheep bred for meat. South African Meat Merino (SAMM), American Rambouillet and German Merinofleischschaf have been bred to balance wool production and carcass quality.

Merino need to be shorn at least once a year because their wool does not stop growing. If the coat is allowed to grow, it can cause heat stress, mobility issues, and blindness.

The Phoenicians introduced sheep from Asia Minor into North Africa and the foundation flocks of the merino in Spain might have been introduced as late as the 12th century by the Marinids, a tribe of Berbers.[citation needed] although there were reports of the breed in the Iberian peninsula before the arrival of the Marinids; perhaps these came from the Merinos or tax collectors of the Kingdom of León, who charged the tenth in wool, beef jerky and cheese.[citation needed] In the 13th and 14th centuries, Spanish breeders introduced English breeds which they bred with local breeds to develop the merino; this influence was openly documented by Spanish writers at the time.[8]

Spain became noted for its fine wool (spinning count between 60s and 64s) and built up a fine wool monopoly between the 12th and 16th centuries, with wool commerce to Flanders and England being a source of income for Castile in the Late Middle Ages.

Most of the flocks were owned by nobility or the church; the sheep grazed the Spanish southern plains in winter and the northern highlands in summer. The Mesta was an organisation of privileged sheep owners who developed the breed and controlled the migrations along cañadas reales suitable for grazing.

The three Merino strains that founded the world’s Merino flocks are the Royal Escurial flocks, the Negretti and the Paula. Among Merino bloodlines stemming from Vermont in the USA, three historical studs were highly important: Infantado, Montarcos and Aguires.

Gear used:

Olympus OM-D EM-1 Mark II

Zuiko 300mm f4 PRO

Photographer Sandro Tasso Wide Angle photo studio

Franschhoek and Paarl

 

Destemming

Destemming time at Boekenhoutskloof Wine Farm Franschhoek

Destemming time at Boekenhoutskloof Wine Farm Franschhoek

The harvesting of wine grapes is one of the most crucial steps in the process of winemaking. The time of harvest is determined primarily by the ripeness of the grape as measured by sugar, acid and tannin levels with winemakers basing their decision to pick based on the style of wine they wish to produce. The weather can also shape the timetable of harvesting with the threat of heat, rain, hail, and frost which can damage the grapes and bring about various vine diseases. In addition to determining the time of the harvest, winemakers and vineyard owners must also determine whether to use hand pickers or mechanical harvesters. The harvest season typically falls between August & October in the Northern Hemisphere and February & April in the Southern Hemisphere. With various climate conditions, grape varieties, and wine styles the harvesting of grapes could happen in every month of the calendar year somewhere in the world.

After the grapes are sorted, they are ready to be de-stemmed and crushed. For many years, men and women did this manually by stomping the grapes with their feet. Nowadays, most wine makers perform this mechanically. Mechanical presses stomp or trod the grapes into what is called must. Must is simply freshly pressed grape juice that contains the skins, seeds, and solids. Mechanical pressing has brought tremendous sanitary gain as well as increased the longevity and quality of the wine.

The destemmer, which is a piece of winemaking machinery that does exactly what it says, removes the stems from the clusters and lightly crushes the grapes.

Modern crushing and destemming machines consist of a large steel or aluminum trough with a screw in the bottom. As the screw turns the grapes are gently squeezed and pulled from the stems at the same time. Out one end pops the stem and out the other is your elixir of life (to be). 

For white wine, the wine maker will quickly crush and press the grapes in order to separate the juice from the skins, seeds, and solids. This is to prevent unwanted color and tannins from leaching into the wine. Red wine, on the other hand, is left in contact with the skins to acquire flavor, color, and additional tannins.

Shot in Franschhoek at Boekenhoutskloof Wine Farm

Gear: Olympus OM-D EM-1 mark II

Lenses: Zuiko 25mm f1.2 PRO | Zuiko 40-150mm f2.8 PRO

 

Martyn and Kirsty Sneak Peak

Martyn and Kirsty Sneak Peak

Martyn and Kirsty Sneak Peak at the romantic getaway Franschhoek Manor Guesthouse in  the Franschhoek beautiful valley Cape Winelands South Africa.

More info at http://www.franschhoekmanor.co.za

Photographer Sandro Tasso

from Wide Angle photo studio

 

Bridge House Grade 7 Farewell

Bridge House Grade 7 Farewell Sneak Peek

Bridge House Grade 7 Farewell Sneak Peek in the beautiful location of Boschendal Farm in Franschhoek

 

 

Franschhoek Uncorked 2016

Franschhoek Uncorked 2016

Franschhoek Uncorked 2016 at Boekenhoutskloof Wine Farm
Lot of fun lot of wine what else? The Chocolate Block
The quest to understand the name of this wine and the wine itself is now the stuff of legend – it’s even launched a graphic novel (see here). While we are not about to reveal all, we can say that the style of the wine is a reflection of our belief that the Cape, with its Mediterranean climate, is eminently suited to blended reds. The make-up of this wine is tweaked from vintage to vintage to best reflect the season and the ancient vines of great character that are an integral part of the wine’s charm and personality.

For more info visit the internet page of Boekenhoutskloof press here.